Review: Kenny & the Book of Beasts


 

        Kenny and the Book of Beasts by Tony DiTerlizzi is the wonderful, charming sequel to Kenny and the Dragon (reviewed here). The sequel would make sense if read alone, but both books are absolutely excellent. I believe this one is better because the characters are deeper. 

        In the opening pages, we find that Kenny has graduated from being the only child, with the addition of a dozen delightful tiny bunnies. They are an adorable handful, and keep Kenny’s parents busy. Between the new litter, and Kenny’s friends being busy with their own life plans, Kenny feels lonely. This is even harder when his best friend Grahame gets the chance to catch up with his long-lost old friend. DiTerlizzi did an excellent job with the details. The adorable dozen are never in danger, and Kenny’s parents take time to check on him when he’s feeling down. Excellent plot.

        This story is really well-timed, as so many of us have had to reduce socializing lately. Also, plenty of adventure and action. I was really looking forward to this book, and I was not disappointed.

        The art is lovely. DiTerlizzi has done an exceptional job with his drawings. Each one is as interesting and detailed as his covers. And the sheep are back! I love the sheep!

Five stars!

Review of Sule: The Proverb Detective. The Case of the Tied-up Lion



        Sule: The Proverb Detective. The Case of the Tied-up Lion by Rene Rawls is a story about a detective helping his friend Fara. Fara is overwhelmed with preparations for a party later that day, when she bumps into Sule. Sule tells her the old proverb “When spiders unite, they can tie up a lion.” and takes off with her list. Thus begins a search and find as Fara attempts to find Sule and her friends in the marketplace. It's a delightful and engrossing tale of friendship.

        The use of a detective to weave in hidden object puzzles is a clever premise, and it is very entertaining. The Case of the Tied-up Lion is filled with a variety of hidden object puzzles. The readers look for spiders, people, and objects on different pages.

        The illustrations by Brittnie Brotzman are two-dimensional cartoons, and the scenes are very detail intensive. The color choices are well-done, with soft natural colors muting the bold clothes and wares of the vendors. The hidden object puzzles are good, challenging, but not too difficult for a younger audience.

        Sule: The Proverb Detective is a series that includes two short animated episodes. One of these, Sule and the Case of the Tiny Sparks, is currently available on YouTube.

Five stars!


*I was given an advance review ebook by the author.

Inkscape Tutorial: Bonsai Elm

Bonsai Elm Tutorial
This is for beginning Inkscape users. The pot is mostly manipulating shapes, while the tree requires drawing with a mouse. You need to know how to create circles, drag lines around, and follow keyboard shortcuts. The goal of this tutorial is be able to draw bonsai, so it goes through a lot of steps quickly. There are some very thorough tutorials listed at the bottom that cover each tool in depth. If you just want the Bonsai Elm svg file to download, go here.

Set up

I have the basic page with A4/letter size paper. No grids, and page visible, which can be adjusted in document properties (Shift+Ctrl+D). I found the number of buttons and controls a bit overwhelming when I was starting, so I have tried to break it down. This tutorial only needs three toolbars visible. I like keyboard shortcuts. The Commands Bar (Or the Edit menu) also accesses the duplicate command.
ViewShow/Hide → Select: Snap Controls Bar, Tool Controls Bar, and Toolbox.
Bonsai Elm Tutorial



Part One: Draw a pot.

Pot lip

Use the circle (F5) to create an oval. Bonsai pots are wide and shallow.
Bonsai Elm Tutorial
The circle fill (Shift+Ctrl+F) is RGBA color code c0632cff, and the stroke paint is set to black, RGBA color code 000000ff.
Bonsai Elm Tutorial

Select the oval and duplicate it (Ctrl+D). Move the duplicate oval down by dragging it, using the down arrow on your keyboard, or using the transform dock (Shift+Ctrl+M) to move it down vertically.
Bonsai Elm Tutorial
Select (F1) the duplicate oval on the bottom and change it from an object to a path (Shift+Ctrl+C).
Bonsai Elm Tutorial
Select the duplicate oval and select edit path by Nodes (F2). You should see nodes along the oval. Add one node on the upper half of the bottom oval by double clicking along line.
Bonsai Elm Tutorial
Enable snapping for the quadrant points of eclipses.
Bonsai Elm Tutorial
Use the edit path by nodes tool (F2) to snap the two nodes on the top of the oval to far edges of the oval above it.
Bonsai Elm Tutorial

Bonsai Elm Tutorial
Use the straight line button on the node toolbar to straighten the top and sides.
Bonsai Elm Tutorial

Bonsai Elm Tutorial

Bonsai Elm Tutorial
Object → Lower (Page down).
Bonsai Elm Tutorial

Pot body

Select the piece you just lowered and duplicate it (Ctrl+D). Move the duplicate down by dragging it, using the down arrow, or using the transform dock (Shift+Ctrl+M) to move it down vertically.
Bonsai Elm Tutorial
Select the new piece and use Transform (Shift+Ctrl+M) Scale to reduce the size, or adjust the size with the corner arrow (this is easier if the ratio of the piece is locked).
Bonsai Elm Tutorial
Enable snapping to cusp nodes.
Bonsai Elm Tutorial
Use the edit path by nodes tool (F2) to snap the two nodes on the top of the new piece to the edges of piece above it.
Bonsai Elm Tutorial
Bonsai Elm Tutorial
Select the new piece and use Transform (Shift+Ctrl+M) Scale to reduce the size, or adjust the size with the corner arrow.
Bonsai Elm Tutorial
Object  → Lower (Page down).
Bonsai Elm Tutorial
Dirt: Duplicate (Ctrl+D) the original top oval. Select the new piece and use Transform (Shift+Ctrl+M) Scale to reduce the size, or adjust the size with the corner arrow.
Bonsai Elm Tutorial

Drag the dirt down, snapping quadrant point to quadrant point with the original oval.
Bonsai Elm Tutorial
Reduce the height of the dirt oval using the top arrow from the selector tool (F1).
Bonsai Elm Tutorial

Final coloring (Shift+Ctrl+F).
Dirt: RGBA 4b2711ff
Pot lip: RGBA d2733bff
Pot body: RGBA c0632cff
Bonsai Elm Tutorial
Select all (Ctrl+A). Group (Ctrl+G). Adjust the stroke paint (Shift+Ctrl+F) to no paint to remove the lines. This can also be accomplished by setting the stroke width to zero.
Bonsai Elm Tutorial

Part two: Draw an elm tree.

Tree Trunk

Use the Bezeir tool (Ctrl+F6) to draw a tree trunk. It is also possible to use the freehand drawing tool for this, but that will generate a lot of nodes. The menu PathSimplify (Ctrl+L) will help if you choose this route, but the more nodes there are, the slower Inkscape will run. This tutorial can help with slow loading or crashing issues.
Bonsai Elm Tutorial

A basic polygon or rectangle is all that is really needed for a tree trunk. The leaves are going to cover the branches. I prefer to have branches, because it looks nice to have them peeking out from between the leaves here and there. Bonsai should have thick, interesting trunks.
Bonsai Elm Tutorial
I used the Bezeir tool (Ctrl+F6) in Regular Mode to create the drawings above. I'm keeping the more complicated drawing (Select the object or path and press Backspace to delete it), and using the edit path by Nodes tool (F2) to smooth it out and make it more interesting and tree-like. It is helpful to toggle the snaps off (%). 
Bonsai Elm Tutorial
No step-by-step for the Node editing because there isn't a wrong way to do this, as long as the end result vaugely resembles a tree. Roy Torley did a very thorough tutorial on the Pen/Bezeir and Node tools. The branches are optional, and will be covered by leaves.
Bonsai Elm Tutorial
Using the paint menu (Shift+Ctrl+F) set the stroke paint to no paint to remove the lines, and set the paint fill for the tree to RGBA 5c3015ff.
Bonsai Elm Tutorial

Tree Leaves

Elm tree leaves, by MPF, CC BY-SA 3.0
Elm tree leaves, by MPF, CC BY-SA 3.0
Use the Bezeir tool (Ctrl+F6) to make a triangle or pentagon, and the edit path by Nodes tool (F2) to pull it into an elm leaf shape. Notice one side of the leaf is a little bigger then the other. Repeat these steps to create three to five unique leaves. No step-by-step because this is artistic license. Another option is to draw a circle or oval (F5), call it good, and proceed.
Bonsai Elm Tutorial

Bonsai Elm Tutorial
Optionally, duplicate (Ctrl+D) the leaves and flatten on the top edge with the edit Nodes tool (F5) to create half leaves.
Bonsai Elm Tutorial
Choose the best leaves, and move and rotate them to form a nice bunch. Click on an already selected (F1) object or path to turn it, or use the move buttons, or the Transform (Shift+Ctrl+M) Dock
Bonsai Elm Tutorial
Select all object on the page (Ctrl+A) and hit the lock button so nothing is warped as it is moved around.
Bonsai Elm Tutorial
Select just the leaves. Group them together (Ctrl+G). Using the paint menu (Shift+Ctrl+F) set stroke paint to no paint to remove the lines, and set the paint fill for the leaves to RGBA 3b5a15ff.
Bonsai Elm Tutorial
Adjust the sizes of all the objects until they look correct, and assemble the bonsai. Select and transform objects: F1. Transform dock: Shift+Ctrl+M. To raise or lower object use menu: ObjectLower (Page down) or ObjectRaise (Page up). Flip vertically: v, flip horizontally: h
Bonsai Elm Tutorial
Duplicate (Ctrl+D) the group (Ctrl+G) of leaves. Move the duplicate copy to another spot and adjust the rotation if needed. Repeat this until the tree has at a blanket of leaves.
Bonsai Elm Tutorial
Duplicate (Ctrl+D) a set of leaves and set the paint fill to RGBA 466b19ff, which is a lighter green. Add another blanket of leaves in the new color.
Bonsai Elm Tutorial
Duplicate (Ctrl+D) a set of leaves and set the paint fill to RGBA 54811eff. Add another blanket of leaves in the new color. The layers of different color leaves create depth.
Bonsai Elm Tutorial


Helpful Inkscape keyboard shortcuts: 

  • Bezeir tool: Ctrl+F6
  • Delete: Select unlucky object or path, Backspace
  • Document properties: Shift+Ctrl+D
  • Duplicate: Ctrl+D
  • Edit path by nodes: F2
  • Flip horizontally: select+h
  • Flip vertically: select+v
  • Create circles, ellipses, and arcs : F5
  • Fill and Stroke: Shift+Ctrl+F
  • Group: Ctrl+G
  • Lower object: Page down
  • Object becomes a path: Shift+Ctrl+C
  • Raise object: Page up
  • Save: Ctrl+S
  • Select and transform objects: F1
  • Snaps on/off: %
  • Transform: Shift+Ctrl+M
  • Undo: Ctrl+Z
  • Ungroup: Ctrl+Shift+G
  • Zoom in: +
  • Zoom out: -
  • Zoom to drawing: 4
  • Zoom to page: 5
I'm running Inkscape 0.92.4 on Chromebook's Linux Beta. 

For more information on bonsai check out Peter Chan’s youtube channel, Herons Bonsai.  [Warning: This is one of those fascinating internet rabbit holes that can contribute to overaccumulation of tiny trees.]

Official Inkscape tutorials are here.
The Official Inkscape Beginner's Guide is here.
Roy Torley created some very comprehensive tutorials here.